It’s T.I.M.E. students demonstrate learning at graduation

By: Kathie Mitchell, Director

On April 13, at the Montgomery County Correctional Facility, nine men participated in their final assignment before earning a graduation certificate. Each student gave an example in six words of what they learned during the 14-week recovery and reentry class. Here are some examples:

 

“How to deal with my anger.”

“Identifying my triggers is a must.”

“How to be a better person.”

“Fail to plan, plan to fail.”

“Anger turned inward, distorts reality always.”

“Changes we make, change our lives.”

 

As a supervisor and observer of this project for past seven years, I’ve been privileged to watch the growth of our students and the class facilitators as we shared information, introduced new concepts and provided a pathway for changes. The newest concept “Telling your story in six words” is an exercise brought to us earlier this year by Cabrini University Professor Catherine Beckowski. By looking at the examples above, you can see it works. Each of the statements relate to a topic we cover in the session and express a feeling or self-reflection.

 

“Thoughtful. Concise. Poignant. Insightful. Inspiring. Humbling.” These are the six words that came to me as I heard the examples on graduation day. The men take this activity seriously and demonstrated what we at Community Advocates knew: The men who participate in the class are trying hard to learn how to change their actions and/or thoughts, educate themselves about resources and return to the community with a plan to succeed.

 

“I tried too hard to help,” said one man. “That’s what got me in here.”

 

This man’s story, like many of our students, is a complicated one. A member of his community’s Lion’s Club, he had recently reconnected with his biological brother. He had a good job and owns a home. But somewhere along the way, his life as he knew it, fell apart.

 

According to his Community Advocates Reentry Plan, he has a home plan and a few options to try to obtain financial support in the community. He is considering college or trade school and named a few places where he might volunteer. He knows that it’s important to have people he can count on and says in his plan that he will connect with these resources. He also has a plan for idle time and a self-care plan for living in the community.

 

But his case has not been settled yet. He has applied to be accepted into one of the specialty courts but the process can take a few months and rejection is possible if he doesn’t meet the criteria.

 

Meanwhile, this man along with his classmates and many others before him, are connecting with peers who facilitate the class. They receive individual help when needed and some are learning about themselves and how to advocate for themselves, for the first time.

 

Trust is a big issue. And finding the resources in the community that will help each person make the changes they desire, isn’t always easy. Going back to the same life and same place where the trouble started is unfortunately, sometimes the only option.

 

But something that won’t change is the new knowledge the students have acquired. They have resources to seek out. And peers to support them.

 

“Being in class, there’s other people like me,” said one young man who also found a spiritual connection along the way. “Loving myself has increased my faith. It allows me to have patience for myself and others.”

 

His six words: “Faith, trust, understanding, strength and love.”

 

These graduates showed us they were thinking, identifying areas in their lives that need work, and are ready to make changes to enter a new life.

 

 

 

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